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Scientist Develop New Treatment for Diabetic Wounds

POSTED ON January 10, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

The solution involves a biomaterial that increases skin cell movement on chronic wounds like bed sores and ulcers.

The solution involves a special biomaterial that increases skin cell movement on chronic wounds.

Within the human body, there are several crucial cell types that aid in the wound healing process. In recent years, there have been several studies aimed at understanding a fundamental aspect of these cells: how they move. With more thorough knowledge of this basic function, scientists can create more effective wound care regimens.

In spring 2015, a team from Germany found that a special protein they named Merlin aids in the migration of epithelial cells. Then, in October 2016, another research collective from Shanghai noted that receptor molecules allow the immune cells known as neutrophils to travel to wounds sites and fend off invading microorganisms.

Now, a group from the University of Toronto’s engineering department has developed an exciting new way to help skin cells move faster, and that could be a huge breakthrough for diabetics everywhere.

Study Uncovers Why Diabetics Experience Chronic Wounds

POSTED ON October 26, 2016  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

German doctors have found that sluggish insulin metabolisms may explain why diabetes is linked to chronic wounds.

New research sheds light on the complex connections between diabetes and chronic wounds.

For millions of people with diabetes worldwide, chronic wounds are a constant concern. According to WoundCareCenters.org, there are several ways diabetes affects wound healing. These include increasing a person’s risk for infection, affecting the health of blood vessels, and causing a loss of sensation that makes self-injury more likely.

One of the root causes for these issues is a diabetic person’s delayed insulin metabolism. As Diabetes U.K. explained, this impeded metabolism impacts much of the body’s wound -healing systems, affecting everything from skin cells to how blood travels. Yet despite the influence of this insulin metabolism, experts still don’t understand the system fully.  A new study is shedding light on the connection between diabetes and wound healing.

Doctors Develop New Regenerative Bandages for Diabetics

POSTED ON September 23, 2016  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

New regenerative bandages improves wound healing.

The work of Northwestern University scientists, a new bandage features a special protein that greatly improves wound healing.

Diabetic foot ulcers are not only painful, but they’re a potentially life-altering and even fatal medical condition. Of the 29.1 million Americans who live with diabetes (per figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 15 percent will eventually develop ulcers, according to a study in the journal Diabetes Care. Not only that, but as data from the American Diabetes Association revealed, 84 percent of all lower limb amputations are preceded by ulcers.

While there are already several effective wound care products available, doctors are continually exploring new ways to better combat this condition. The latest such innovation comes courtesy of a team of biomedical engineers and researchers from Northwestern University.

9 Important Stats Surrounding Diabetes and Diabetic Wounds

POSTED ON August 26, 2016  - POSTED IN wound care

9 relevant tips for diabetic wound care.

These figures will help patients better understand diabetes and associated wound care outcomes.

Diabetes is an especially destructive condition. It knows no geographical boundaries and affects the lives of millions of men, women, and children across the globe. Diabetes can also complicate the wound healing process, thus exacerbating the condition.

There is research into diabetes being done all the time; for instance, wounds may heal slowly in these patients due to diminished electrical activity in the body. But there is so much more data available, and it’s important for patients to understand these figures to comprehend both diabetes and the associated wound care outcomes.

Diabetics May Have Slow-Healing Wounds Due to Electrical Currents

POSTED ON August 4, 2016  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Electical currents affect diabetic wound healing.

New study shows diabetic patients have slower healing wounds due to issues with electrical currents.

Though more than 6 million Americans live with chronic wounds (per figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, this is an especially prevalent issue in diabetics. In fact a report in Healthy Cells magazine noted that diabetic patients have a 15 percent high risk of developing chronic wounds. That’s because diabetes can impede the body’s natural wound healing processes, leaving patients to deal with painful injuries like ulcers for months at a time.

Now, though, new insight into the true scope of diabetes’ impact on the body have been uncovered. And, this new knowledge could have a significant impact on future wound care regimens for diabetics.

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