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New Study Unveils How Skin Substitutions Work

POSTED ON January 20, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

This important breakthrough could help doctors everywhere develop safe and effective new treatments for injuries like ulcers.

This breakthrough could help doctors develop safe and effective treatments for injuries like ulcers.

In the last several months, there have been a number of important breakthroughs in skin grafts and other substitutions. Doctors from Stanford University created new grafts capable of treating a rare skin condition called epidermolysis bulls. Around the same time, researchers from the American Burn Association announced an extra durable skin substitution for children with severe burns. Meanwhile, in California, a team developed liquid grafts that are easy to apply and provide ample protection to wounds.

Yet despite all these achievements, many doctors would admit they’re not totally aware of how these grafts works or the mechanisms that led to effective wound healing. Today, courtesy of a new study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, we may have new insight into how skin grafts aid wound care.

Breakthroughs galore


The team behind this exciting new breakthrough represents the Regenerative Medicine Research Program at the University of Miami. To fully explore the role of skin grafts on facilitating the healing process of ulcers and other injuries, the researchers spent months studying Apligraf.

Developed by a separate group of researchers from Boston, Apligraf is actually what’s described as a bilayered living cellular construct. The graft contains two layers, one of keratinocytes and another of fibroblasts. When applied to non-healing wounds, Apligraf provides the collagen and proteins necessary for proper wound healing. Still, that doesn’t fully answer how wounds that haven’t healed for months at a time suddenly heal within just a few weeks.

So, the Miami team performed biopsies on a serious of wounds over a month and applied Apligraf while still profiling the wound site. Eventually, that gave them understanding of the ulcer at a genetic level, which helped to see how the wounds had healed. Effectively, substitutions like Apligraf work by actually making the body believe that the ulcers are “normal” wounds and should be healed accordingly.

In an accompanying press release, lead author Marjana Tomic-Canic explained the importance of such a fundamental undertaking.

“This is the first time this type of detailed gene expression analysis has been conducted to evaluate the response to a wound healing modality,” she said. “Our findings show that Apligraf can shift the gene expression profile of a chronic, non-healing ulcer to resemble a profile similar to that of an acute, healing wound. This is important as we now can use this as a guiding tool to understand healing of a chronic wound and mechanisms by which therapies can work.”

For all your specialized wound care products, turn to Advanced Tissue. The company delivers to both homes and long-term care facilities.


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Download Our FREE Wound Healing Nutrition Guide to learn more about maintaining a wound healing diet.

Silk Used to Create New Wound Care Mat

POSTED ON January 12, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

Indian scientists have created a mat that can help heal wounds more quickly and even regrow tissue components like hair follicles.

Indian scientists have created a mat that can help heal wounds more quickly and even regrow tissue.

While most people assume it’s meant for clothing and other fine garments, silk does actually have a role to play in the greater wound care industry.
This is especially true for Muga silk, which hails from India and is celebrated for both durability and texture. In early 2015, one study from a group in Mumbai found that sutures made from Muga significantly improved wound healing rates in rabbits. Meanwhile, a 2013 study in the journal Advanced Healthcare Materials found that wound dressings composed of a patented silk protein-biomaterial had the same healing effects for laboratory mice.

Today, the use of silk in wound care continues as a team from the Indian Institute of Technology has unveiled a new form of wound dressing that could have some promising results.

Scientists Create New Self-Repairing Material

POSTED ON January 11, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

Inspired by the comic book character Wolverine, scientists created a new material that can heal on its own in under 24 hours.

Inspired by the comic book character Wolverine, scientists created a new material that can heal on its own in under 24 hours.

While some people might think comic books are a fun distraction, they’ve made a difference in the real world. Case in point: Several noteworthy characters have inspired exciting new developments in the wound care industry. In spring 2016, a team of scientists from the UK used the web-shooter of the iconic Spider-Man as the basis for a gun that can create customizable dressings.

Now, a group of researchers from the University of California, Riverside have found similar inspiration in Wolverine, a mutant hero with claws and powers of regeneration. It’s the latter ability that most interested the team, and as they detail in a new study in the journal Advanced Materials, they’ve created a self-healing material that has multiple purposes.

Mega material

The material in question is described as an ionic conductor, and is effectively a series of microscopic robots that work in unison. In order to create the material, the UCR team looked not only to Wolverine but also how wounds heal in mammal models. To actually get a material that can heal on its own, the researchers had to make use of what’s called the ion-dipole force. According to Boundless, this phenomenon is an attraction between ions and molecules with two magnetized poles. Even when pulled apart, the ion and molecule are eventually drawn back together.

So just how effective is the material, which is similar in consistency to rubber? It can be stretched up to 50 times without losing its durability. When it’s finally cut or torn, the material will heal in just under 24 hours, and it can be stretched again right after it’s finished healing. It’s worth noting that the material works best at room temperature, and the impact of cold has yet to be fully established.

In an accompanying press release, co-author Chao Wang explained the material had been puzzling the UCR team for several years, as they experienced issues with finding a way to let the material heal on its own. Similar self-healing polymers, for instance, use non-covalent bonds, and these can be affected by electrochemical reactions.

This Wolverine material, however, doesn’t suffer from such laminations, and that will allow it to be used for several functions. While that exact list is still being determined – though use in extending lithium-ion batteries was mentioned – the sky could very well be the limit for this astounding new material.

For all your specialized wound care products, turn to Advanced Tissue. The company delivers to both homes and long-term care facilities.


Download Now

Download Our FREE Wound Healing Nutrition Guide to learn more about maintaining a wound healing diet.

Scientist Develop New Treatment for Diabetic Wounds

POSTED ON January 10, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

The solution involves a biomaterial that increases skin cell movement on chronic wounds like bed sores and ulcers.

The solution involves a special biomaterial that increases skin cell movement on chronic wounds.

Within the human body, there are several crucial cell types that aid in the wound healing process. In recent years, there have been several studies aimed at understanding a fundamental aspect of these cells: how they move. With more thorough knowledge of this basic function, scientists can create more effective wound care regimens.

In spring 2015, a team from Germany found that a special protein they named Merlin aids in the migration of epithelial cells. Then, in October 2016, another research collective from Shanghai noted that receptor molecules allow the immune cells known as neutrophils to travel to wounds sites and fend off invading microorganisms.

Now, a group from the University of Toronto’s engineering department has developed an exciting new way to help skin cells move faster, and that could be a huge breakthrough for diabetics everywhere.

Bamboo Used to Develop New Wound Care Dressing

POSTED ON January 6, 2017  - POSTED IN Uncategorized, Wound healing

These new bamboo dressings were found to accelerate wound healing as well as prevent issue with odors.

These new bamboo dressings were found to accelerate wound healing as well as prevent issue with odors.

Anyone who has even the faintest insight might be aware of the sheer number of unique material types used in the wound care industry.

There are the more traditional options, like collagen and hydrocolloid. While those options are relied on most often in hospital settings, researchers are continually making upgrades and improvements. Part of that expansion means new materials. For instance, fish have become a frequent source for wound dressings, as their skin contains several beneficial compounds. However, not all new dressing types are as organic; some feature computer technology to make monitoring a snap.

Now, another dressing-related breakthrough has emerged courtesy of a team of doctors from the Centre of Innovative and Applied Bioprocessing in Punjabi, India.

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