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3 Foods That Complicate the Wound Healing Process

3 Foods That Complicate the Wound Healing Process

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enhanced wound healing

Some foods, like turmeric spice, can influence your wound healing capabilities.

By now you might be well aware of foods that actively improve wound healing. For instance, tomatoes bolster a strong immune system, while kale and yogurt can help fight off infection. At the same time, not all foods are good for you, and some can impede your wound care regimen. Knowing what not to eat can be tricky, and not everyone might have the same dietary restrictions. To make sure you’re maintaining the best nutrition plan possible for your wounds, here are three food items to avoid:

1. Certain spices

Additives like ginger and turmeric are not only tasty, but they can actually be beneficial up to a point. The former features salicylate, as Healthline explained, a major chemical component of stroke-preventing aspirin. The latter, meanwhile, has been proven to greatly reduce your risk of clots, according to a 2010 study published in the journal Platelets. However, consuming too much of these spices can prevent your body from forming blood clots. As Johns Hopkins Medical School explained, clots are vital for healing wounds. Once an injury occurs, blood begins to clump together, creating clots that close off the wound and prevent further bleeding. As a result, it’s important to consume spices like ginger and turmeric in moderation.

2. Skim milk

Valori Treloar is a dermatologist and author of several skin care books. Speaking with Prevention magazine, she said that while milk’s array of vitamins is good for you, skim milk can affect your insulin production and the body’s natural inflammatory response. Inflammation is your body’s first reaction to injury, as it stops bleeding and helps create clots. However, if your body’s natural systems are out of whack, it can lead to a condition called chronic inflammation which has a number of negative effects. Not only will it leave you prone to bacterial infection, but it can impair your immune function.

3. Sugar

For years people have heard about the dangers of high-sugar diets. More recently, researchers at the University of Texas’ M.D. Anderson Cancer Center linked sugar to an increased risk of breast cancer. As you might expect, the dangers of excessive sugar also apply to wound care. As Shape magazine explained, sugar affects the levels of collagen in your skin. And, as Wound Care Advisor pointed out, collagen is a critical component of wound healing. It’s the chemical that gives your skin its tensile strength, and without it, your skin is more fragile and thus vulnerable to injury. It’s no wonder, then, that several kinds of dressings feature collagen, which can also help prevent some infections.

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