Request
a smartPAC
Contact Advanced Tissue
1-877-811-6080
webinfo@advtis.com

ADVANCED TISSUE BLOG

Important Tips for Fighting the Cold and Flu

POSTED ON February 6, 2017  - POSTED IN Uncategorized, Wound healing

Flu prevention takes a few simple steps that some people don't always follow.

Flu prevention takes a few simple steps that some people don’t always follow.

Every winter season, countless Americans come down with the cold or flu. These issues affect people of all ages and health backgrounds, and having the cold or flu can range from minor annoyance to a more serious medical concern that requires hospitalization. These bugs can be so severe that, as the Yale Scientific pointed out, your immune system becomes impeded. In turn, this lowered defense can impact your greater wellbeing, like delaying proper wound healing. That’s why it’s so essential to take as many steps as possible to protect yourself from or reduce the impact of the cold or flu.

Literacy Impacts Wound Compliance and Healing

POSTED ON February 3, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound care products

Advanced Tissue has taken a role in addressing the impact of literacy in wound healing.

Wound care product videos are linked to each customized Smart Pac.

Although the average adult reads on a seventh-grade level, according to an article in American Family Physician the majority of health care literature is written at the 10th grade level. Individuals with inadequate health literacy are more likely to be hospitalized than patients with adequate skills.

New Antibiotic Spider Silk Developed for Wound Care

POSTED ON February 3, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

Created by a team from the U.K., engineered spider silk thread could help combat infections among patients with diabetic foot ulcers and similar injuries.

Engineered spider silk thread could help combat infections among patients with diabetic foot ulcers and similar injuries.

It’s long been established that spider silk can actually help heal wounds of varying type and severity.

Some of the most recent research into the benefits of spider silk came from the University of Akron in Ohio. Back in 2012, a team from the polymer sciences department created a special synthetic thread that could help heal damaged tendons. Right around the same time, a group from Germany’s RWTH Aachen University had a similar breakthrough with silk, though their thread also had engineering uses in airplane construction and maintenance.

Now, yet another new development with spider silk has occurred courtesy of a team from the University of Nottingham in the U.K.

New Study Boosts Role of EST in Proper Wound Care

POSTED ON February 2, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound healing

A new scientific review has added further data to the effectiveness of treating wounds via electrical stimulation therapy.

A new scientific review has added further data to the effectiveness of treating wounds via electrical stimulation therapy.

In the wound care industry especially, ongoing research is essential to continued success for patients. As a result, there are always exciting studies being undertaken to uncover new truths about the human body or to develop new products like advanced dressings and skin repair tools.

However, for studies to make a difference in the real world, they have to be verified, and that comes during the lengthy peer-review process. By examining the results of studies multiple times, scientists can gauge just how these discoveries or devices will fair in the real world.

Most recently, one such review was published in the Journal of Chronic Wound Care Management and Research, featuring essential information about treating wounds via electrical stimulation therapy

Studying Worms Offers Insight Into Human Wound Care

POSTED ON February 1, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound healing

A team from Stanford is using nanoparticles to study wound healing in worms, and that could eventually translate to aiding human beings.

Using nanoparticles to study wound healing in worms could eventually translate to aiding human beings.

A large percentage of research projects in the wound care industry focus on finding new ways to heal specific injuries. That could be the development of new drugs, the creation of groundbreaking dressing types or new methods for detecting harmful infections.

Yet while doctors create these new technologies, there are also efforts to better understand the core functions of wound healing. For instance, in fall 2016, doctors from the University of Minnesota found how sweat glands of elderly people actually impeded normal wound healing. These essential tidbits of information expand our knowledge base and make new research possible in the first place.

Now, a team at Stanford University is delving deeper into the wound healing basics, and their efforts could have huge implications for patients the world over.

Back to Top