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ADVANCED TISSUE BLOG

The Royal Jelly of Bees Contains the Latest Breakthrough in Wound Care

POSTED ON August 25, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

According to new research, a secretion produced by bees has antiseptic properties that could contribute to wound healing

A secretion produced by bees has antiseptic properties that could contribute to wound healing

Over the past several years, the increasing death rate of bees has become a topic of concern for ecologists everywhere. As mortality rates escalate, people have begun to realize the important role that bee pollination plays in our ecosystem (even turning the distress into a popular meme). Now there is another reason to appreciate the hard work of honeybees. According to new research, a secretion produced by bees has antiseptic properties that could contribute to wound healing.

Probiotic Therapy Emerges as Possible Treatment for Wound Infections

POSTED ON August 23, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound infections

An emerging trend in wound care research is the use of probiotics and healthy bacteria to prevent infection.

An emerging trend in wound care research is the use of probiotics and healthy bacteria to prevent infection.

 

You may have heard the phrase “good bacteria” in reference to the gut-residing microorganisms that aid digestion. Whereas clinicians have long known that these bacteria are an important part of the digestive system, little is known about the bacteria of the human skin microbiome. As the amount of antibacterial-resistant bacteria increases, wound infections become increasingly fatal due to lack of treatment methods. Recent wound care research has focused on the human skin microbiome as a source of alternative wound infection therapies. An emerging trend in wound care research is the use of probiotics and healthy bacteria to prevent infection.

New DNA “Sunscreen” Becomes More UV-Protectant the Longer it’s Used

POSTED ON August 21, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

What if sunscreen could actually become more effective as you soak in the sun? Researchers from Binghamton University are working towards that goal.

 Researchers are working towards a sunscreen that becomes more effective as you soak in the sun.

 

The importance of applying UV protection has been emphasized by medical professionals, journals and news outlets across the world. However, applying sunscreen just once throughout the day is sometimes not enough. As the sunscreen you apply comes in contact with sun, sweat and water, the protection wears away. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends reapplying sunscreen approximately every two hours. But what if your sunscreen could actually become more effective as you soak in the sun? And what if the UV protection that you apply not only shielded healing wounds from harmful rays but also created an environment that encouraged regeneration? Researchers from Binghamton University in New York are working towards that goal.

Promising New Innovations in Wound Dressings

POSTED ON August 18, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound dressings

With shocking statistics in mind, scientists are focusing on developing smarter wound dressings that do more to heal wounds and prevent infections.

Scientists are focusing on developing smarter wound dressings that do more to heal wounds and prevent infections.

According to Healogics’ 2017 Wound Care Awareness campaign, 6.7 million Americans are suffering from non-healing wounds. Further, amputees have a 50% mortality rate within 5 years of the operation. With these shocking statistics in mind, scientists are focusing on developing smarter wound care products that do more to heal wounds and prevent infections.

Creepy-Crawly Ancient Practice Making a Comeback in Contemporary Wound Care

POSTED ON August 16, 2017  - POSTED IN Uncategorized

Now, organizations are advocating for larval therapy as a common procedure in chronic wound care, rather than a last resort method.

Organizations are advocating for larval therapy as a common procedure in wound care, rather than a last resort.

It may make your skin crawl, but one antiquated practice is having a bona fide renaissance in modern-day medicine; Larval therapy as a technique for healing wounds is gaining popularity. The procedure, which uses the flesh-eating larvae of the greenbottle blowfly to clean chronic wounds of dead tissue, was used prominently in Civil War battlefield medicine. While it might seem archaic, rising rates of diabetes coupled with recent increases in bacterial drug-resistant abilities have led scientists to look to the past for new solutions, as reported by Thrillist Health. Now, organizations such as Today’s Wound Clinic are advocating for larval therapy as a common procedure in chronic wound care, rather than a last-resort method.

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