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Depression, Anxiety May Lead to Post-Surgical Wounds

Depression, Anxiety May Lead to Post-Surgical Wounds

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A new study has found that depression and anxiety in patients can increase their risk of post-surgical complications.

A new study has found that depression and anxiety can increase the risk of post-surgical complications

Depression and anxiety are normal parts of everyday life for millions of Americans. According to figures from Anxiety and Depression Association of America, anxiety is the most common form of mental disorders, affecting about 40 million U.S. adults. Depression, meanwhile, impacts the lives of 15 million American adults.

While experiencing these emotional conditions says nothing of you personally, it’s when they’re unchecked that they can take a toll. Untreated depression and anxiety can prevent you from maintaining proper social connections and pursuing your goals with sustained momentum. These feelings can also affect your personal health.

More recently, a team from the University of Manchester has uncovered another important impact of these and other mental health issues.

A larger scope of study 

As outlined in a brand new study in the British Journal of Surgery, anxiety and depression may increase a person’s risk of wound-related complications following surgery. In order to better understand the impact of these mental health conditions, the Manchester team studied 177,000 patients in the U.K. who’d undergone any number of surgeries, including hernia repair, varicose vein procedures, and hip and knee replacements.

In the case of procedures involving the hip, people were. 1.17 times more likely to experience complications – including swelling and even infections – if they had some history of moderate anxiety or depression. This same group also had a significantly higher risk of requiring re-admittance, and those who did return to the hospital had to stay much longer than some of their counterparts. While the rate of wound complications seemed to be highest among hip replacements, there were similar figures for the other procedures examined in the study.

There are several important reasons for this study. Not only does it show the greater scope of influences on post-surgical wound care, but it also proves that a patient’s mental state must be considered before any procedure. That way, doctors and patients together can address these issues and thus plan for a safer, less complicated post-surgical regimen.

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