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Adding Yoga and Meditation to Your Wound Care Regimen

POSTED ON September 21, 2016  - POSTED IN wound care

Yoga and meditation can benefit your wound care regimen.

Yoga and meditation can help address stress and anxiety as well as provide many physical benefits.

If you’re one of the 6 million or so Americans living with chronic wounds (per figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), you’re no doubt already begun a regular wound care regimen. While these vary from person to person, successful wound healing often takes a multi-faceted approach, involving several forms of therapy, such as skin grafts, topical oxygen application, or negative pressure treatments.

But did you also know that there are alternative methods? Yoga and meditation, for instance, are two approaches that can have a huge impact on your health and well-being.

New Antibiotic Compound Discovered in Human Nose

POSTED ON September 14, 2016  - POSTED IN wound care

Study shows new antibiotic compound that could improve wound care.

Lugdunin could help stem the tide against the deadly staphylococcus aureus bacterium.

Of all the many bacteria in the world, staphylococcus aureus may be the most detrimental to preventing wound infections and treating existing injuries.

This strain has helped to usher in the era of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, per a 2010 review in Nature Reviews Microbiology, and S. aureus is among the most potent of all microbes. It’s no wonder than that S. aureus was the cause of 11.6 million ER visits between 2001 and 2003, according to a 2006 report in Emerging Infectious Diseases with patients suffering either skin or soft tissue infections. And, as the Los Angeles Times reported, over 11,000 people die each year from S. aureus infections. There is even some research that indicates that S. aureus may be linked to a higher risk for diabetes.

Though research continues into new methods to defeat this microbial scourge, new hope rests closer than we might have imagined.

Ways to Reduce the Risk of Amputations

POSTED ON September 2, 2016  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Helpful ways to reduce the risk of amputations.

There are many ways diabetics can reduce their risk of amputation.

Amputations occur for a number of different reasons, including trauma and as a result of long-term conditions like diabetes. The Amputee Coalition of America estimated, there are roughly 185,000 new lower limb amputations each year. Not only that, but many researchers believe the numbers will increase significantly by 2050, with an eventual amputee population of 3.6 million Americans. Fortunately, there are steps patients can take to prevent these limb removals, and often they involve effective wound care management.

9 Important Stats Surrounding Diabetes and Diabetic Wounds

POSTED ON August 26, 2016  - POSTED IN wound care

9 relevant tips for diabetic wound care.

These figures will help patients better understand diabetes and associated wound care outcomes.

Diabetes is an especially destructive condition. It knows no geographical boundaries and affects the lives of millions of men, women, and children across the globe. Diabetes can also complicate the wound healing process, thus exacerbating the condition.

There is research into diabetes being done all the time; for instance, wounds may heal slowly in these patients due to diminished electrical activity in the body. But there is so much more data available, and it’s important for patients to understand these figures to comprehend both diabetes and the associated wound care outcomes.

Doctors Develop New Method to Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON August 15, 2016  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

New treatment developed for diabetic foot ulcers.

A new technique could help treat foot ulcers more effectively.

According to the American Podiatric Medical Association, diabetic foot ulcers have several primary causes, including the loss of feeling and diminished circulation that accompany diabetes. No matter the cause, though, one thing is clear: these ulcers have become a common scourge for diabetic patients.

According to a 2011 report in the journal Data Points,  approximately 10 to 15 percent of diabetics develop an ulcer at least once in their life. With estimates putting the worldwide diabetic population at 300 million people by 2025, there will be a need for increasingly effective treatments.

Fortunately, there is just such a groundbreaking new approach on the way.

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