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Four Keys to Preventing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON January 19, 2018  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Researchers have created a list of four keys to preventing diabetic foot ulcers.

 

The potential impact of a diabetic foot ulcer has been widely documented. Based on work that appeared in the European Journal of Vascular & Endovascular Surgery, researchers determined that 85 percent of all amputations performed on people with diabetes began with a foot ulcer. With that in mind, a four-pronged approach may be the key to preventing the ulcers and reducing the chances of complications.

PAVE Program Seeks to Ease Path for Veterans with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON January 5, 2018  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

The PAVE program encourages military veterans to self-check to prevent diabetic foot ulcers.

A veterans hospital in Reno, Nevada, is hoping to pave the way to pave the way to good health with a new program aimed at encouraging diabetic wound care among former military personnel.

The Reno VA Hospital recently unveiled that they will participate in the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Prevent Amputations in Veterans Everywhere (PAVE) program. The program was originally established in 1993 as the Preservation-Amputation Care and Treatment Program in 1993.

SmartMat May Provide Early Warning of Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON November 3, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

A molecule contained in a parasitic worm could hold a solution to treating slow wound healing.

A special mat may help clinicians in early detection of the conditions that can lead to a diabetic foot ulcer.

A special mat that can detect conditions that may lead to a diabetic foot ulcer could be a solution to one of the most common causes of hospitalization among patients with type 2 diabetes.

Researchers at the startup Podimetrics said the special software-enabled mat can help detect temperature differences in areas of the food that may indicate nerve damage, Diabetes.Co.UK reported. Patients with nerve damage may not be able to sense any pain, thus they may not recognize the development of a foot ulcer.

Doctors Use Sea Salt Spray to Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON August 9, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

The all-natural approach has shown promising evidence in fully healing these ulcers in just a few weeks' time.

The all-natural approach has shown promising evidence in fully healing these ulcers in just a few weeks’ time.

 

In America especially, diabetic foot ulcers have become problematic in recent years. In fact, 20 percent of all diabetic individuals will develop these wounds, according to a report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Perhaps that’s why there has been a number of exciting new developments in how these ulcers are treated.

A team from China is using stem cells derived from skin appendages to improve wound healing for ulcers. Similarly, a research collective from Texas is utilizing cord cells for the same purpose. Meanwhile, a group from Northwestern University is using a mix of proteins and various cells to create regenerative bandages.

New technology may lead to early detection of diabetic foot ulcers

POSTED ON July 19, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Diabetic foot ulcers may be detected by patients’ foot temperatures

A new study suggests that diabetic foot ulcers may be detected by monitoring patients’ foot temperatures.

Foot ulcers are a painful side effect that many diabetics incur as a result of foot-tissue disintegration. While diabetic foot ulcers are often manageable, the wounds require proper care in order to prevent infection. A new study suggests that such ulcers may be detected by the remote monitoring of patients’ foot temperatures.

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