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Four Keys to Preventing Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON January 19, 2018  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Researchers have created a list of four keys to preventing diabetic foot ulcers.

 

The potential impact of a diabetic foot ulcer has been widely documented. Based on work that appeared in the European Journal of Vascular & Endovascular Surgery, researchers determined that 85 percent of all amputations performed on people with diabetes began with a foot ulcer. With that in mind, a four-pronged approach may be the key to preventing the ulcers and reducing the chances of complications.

PAVE Program Seeks to Ease Path for Veterans with Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON January 5, 2018  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

The PAVE program encourages military veterans to self-check to prevent diabetic foot ulcers.

A veterans hospital in Reno, Nevada, is hoping to pave the way to pave the way to good health with a new program aimed at encouraging diabetic wound care among former military personnel.

The Reno VA Hospital recently unveiled that they will participate in the Department of Veterans Affairs’ Prevent Amputations in Veterans Everywhere (PAVE) program. The program was originally established in 1993 as the Preservation-Amputation Care and Treatment Program in 1993.

Diabetes Awareness Month Offers Tips for Avoiding Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON November 13, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

During Diabetes Awareness Month, patients are encouraged to take an active role in their care, including preventing foot ulcers.

Diabetes Awareness Month teaches patients to take an active role in their care, including preventing foot ulcers.

Rather than passive recipients of care, diabetic foot wound patients and the actions they take are an important part of the healing process. With that in mind, the importance of patient self-care in treating diabetes and diabetic wounds is the theme of this year’s Diabetes Awareness Month.

Canadian Doctors Launch New Program to Fight Ulcers

POSTED ON February 22, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

A new program pairs diabetic patients with podiatrists to ensure early detection of harmful ulcers.

A new program pairs diabetic patients with podiatrists to ensure early detection of harmful ulcers.

There is a profound link between diabetes and foot-related injuries for patients across the world. In fact, per a groundbreaking study published in the JAMA Network, 25 percent of all diabetics will experience foot wounds at some point in their lives. That’s because many diabetic patients must deal with peripheral neuropathy, in which they lose sensation in their hands and feet.

This can lead to cuts and other injuries, which can eventually develop into painful ulcers. And, as a report from the American Diabetes Association pointed out, nearly 20 percent of those foot ulcers will require amputation.

But that doesn’t have to continue to be the case, and there are some doctors and researchers who are taking steps to better prevent ulcers and any accompany side effects.

Doctors Use Sea Salt Spray to Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON February 7, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs.

Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs.

In America especially, diabetic foot ulcers have become problematic in recent years. In fact, 20 percent of all diabetic individuals will develop these wounds, according to a report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Perhaps that’s why there has been a number of exciting new developments in how these ulcers are treated.

A team from China is using stem cells derived from skin appendages to improve wound healing for ulcers. Similarly, a research collective from Texas is utilizing cord cells for the same purpose. Meanwhile, a group from Northwestern University is using a mix of proteins and various cells to create regenerative bandages.

A common thread among these projects is that they rely on groundbreaking technologies. However, a group of scientists from the Wound Institute of Beverly Hills is relying on a much more elemental solution to treat diabetic foot ulcers.

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