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Important Foot-Care Tips All Diabetics Should Know

POSTED ON April 13, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

According to the Joslin Diabetes Center, a quarter of people with diabetes will experience foot-related problems - including neuropathy, sores, blisters and infections.

A quarter of people with diabetes will experience foot-related problems.

For many people currently living with diabetes, foot care is not a top priority. While it is easy to let issues like balancing blood sugar, monitoring insulin and trying to eat a nutritious diet take center stage, it is crucial for diabetics to place some focus on their feet.

According to the Joslin Diabetes Center, a quarter of people with diabetes will experience foot-related problems – including neuropathy, sores, blisters and wound infections. Neuropathy, which refers to nerve damage in the feet, is often the initial problem, explained Everyday Health. People with neuropathy are less able to detect pain or discomfort in their feet, which means they are more prone to physical injuries like burns and cuts. Even after receiving a diagnosis of neuropathy, there are many steps you can take to keep your feet healthy.

U.K. Doctors Create New Gel for Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON March 10, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

The gel is made from a patient's own blood, and can help increase wound healing rates and lower the risk of allergic reactions.

The gel is made from a patient’s own blood, and can help increase wound healing rates and lower the risk of allergic reactions.

 

The human body is a wonderful web of interconnected systems, with all sorts of mechanisms to ensure everything from proper digestion to keeping your heart beating and your lungs pumping. It’s no wonder, then, that the modern wound care industry has relied on the body itself to better address non-healing or otherwise cumbersome wounds.

Doctors Use Sea Salt Spray to Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON February 7, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs.

Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs.

In America especially, diabetic foot ulcers have become problematic in recent years. In fact, 20 percent of all diabetic individuals will develop these wounds, according to a report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Perhaps that’s why there has been a number of exciting new developments in how these ulcers are treated.

A team from China is using stem cells derived from skin appendages to improve wound healing for ulcers. Similarly, a research collective from Texas is utilizing cord cells for the same purpose. Meanwhile, a group from Northwestern University is using a mix of proteins and various cells to create regenerative bandages.

A common thread among these projects is that they rely on groundbreaking technologies. However, a group of scientists from the Wound Institute of Beverly Hills is relying on a much more elemental solution to treat diabetic foot ulcers.

Literacy Impacts Wound Compliance and Healing

POSTED ON February 3, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound care products

Advanced Tissue has taken a role in addressing the impact of literacy in wound healing.

Wound care product videos are linked to each customized Smart Pac.

Although the average adult reads on a seventh-grade level, according to an article in American Family Physician the majority of health care literature is written at the 10th grade level. Individuals with inadequate health literacy are more likely to be hospitalized than patients with adequate skills.

New Antibiotic Spider Silk Developed for Wound Care

POSTED ON February 3, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

Created by a team from the U.K., engineered spider silk thread could help combat infections among patients with diabetic foot ulcers and similar injuries.

Engineered spider silk thread could help combat infections among patients with diabetic foot ulcers and similar injuries.

It’s long been established that spider silk can actually help heal wounds of varying type and severity.

Some of the most recent research into the benefits of spider silk came from the University of Akron in Ohio. Back in 2012, a team from the polymer sciences department created a special synthetic thread that could help heal damaged tendons. Right around the same time, a group from Germany’s RWTH Aachen University had a similar breakthrough with silk, though their thread also had engineering uses in airplane construction and maintenance.

Now, yet another new development with spider silk has occurred courtesy of a team from the University of Nottingham in the U.K.

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