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Maintaining Healthy Skin While Living With Diabetes

POSTED ON May 10, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

An important - yet often overlooked - part of efficient diabetes management is taking care of your skin.

An important – yet often overlooked – part of efficient diabetes management is taking care of your skin.

 

An important – yet often overlooked – part of efficient diabetes management is taking care of your skin. According to Joslin Diabetes Center, many diabetics deal with dry skin, which can come about as a result of fluid loss due to high blood sugar. Diabetic neuropathy can also contribute to dry skin along the legs and feet, since it hinders the body’s ability to produce sweat in those areas.

Important Information for Preventing Diabetic Amputation

POSTED ON May 2, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Because diabetes impacts the body's circulation and nerve health, individuals living with this disease are at risk for developing foot issues.

Because diabetes impacts the body’s circulation and nerve health, diabetics are at risk for developing foot issues.

Because diabetes impacts the body’s circulation and nerve health, individuals living with this disease are at risk for developing foot issues.

Foot ulcers, which resemble open sores, are among the most common orthopedic problems that diabetic patients have to deal with. If left unattended, these lacerations can become severe, and even result in the need for amputation.

Safe and Healthy Travel Tips for Diabetics

POSTED ON April 25, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

If you're nervous about taking a vacation while managing your disease, read on to discover useful tips for traveling with diabetes.

If you’re nervous about taking a vacation, read on to discover useful tips for traveling with diabetes.

 

While living with diabetes means you need to maintain a constant focus on your health and wellness, managing your disease shouldn’t cause you to miss out on what the world has to offer. With careful planning and the right information, diabetics can remain happy and healthy no matter how far from home they may travel.

Canadian Doctors Launch New Program to Fight Ulcers

POSTED ON February 22, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

A new program pairs diabetic patients with podiatrists to ensure early detection of harmful ulcers.

A new program pairs diabetic patients with podiatrists to ensure early detection of harmful ulcers.

There is a profound link between diabetes and foot-related injuries for patients across the world. In fact, per a groundbreaking study published in the JAMA Network, 25 percent of all diabetics will experience foot wounds at some point in their lives. That’s because many diabetic patients must deal with peripheral neuropathy, in which they lose sensation in their hands and feet.

This can lead to cuts and other injuries, which can eventually develop into painful ulcers. And, as a report from the American Diabetes Association pointed out, nearly 20 percent of those foot ulcers will require amputation.

But that doesn’t have to continue to be the case, and there are some doctors and researchers who are taking steps to better prevent ulcers and any accompany side effects.

Doctors Use Sea Salt Spray to Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON February 7, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs.

Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs.

In America especially, diabetic foot ulcers have become problematic in recent years. In fact, 20 percent of all diabetic individuals will develop these wounds, according to a report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Perhaps that’s why there has been a number of exciting new developments in how these ulcers are treated.

A team from China is using stem cells derived from skin appendages to improve wound healing for ulcers. Similarly, a research collective from Texas is utilizing cord cells for the same purpose. Meanwhile, a group from Northwestern University is using a mix of proteins and various cells to create regenerative bandages.

A common thread among these projects is that they rely on groundbreaking technologies. However, a group of scientists from the Wound Institute of Beverly Hills is relying on a much more elemental solution to treat diabetic foot ulcers.

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