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Doctors Use Sea Salt Spray to Treat Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON February 7, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs.

Doctors have created a treatment for foot ulcers using sea salt taken from coral reefs.

In America especially, diabetic foot ulcers have become problematic in recent years. In fact, 20 percent of all diabetic individuals will develop these wounds, according to a report from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. Perhaps that’s why there has been a number of exciting new developments in how these ulcers are treated.

A team from China is using stem cells derived from skin appendages to improve wound healing for ulcers. Similarly, a research collective from Texas is utilizing cord cells for the same purpose. Meanwhile, a group from Northwestern University is using a mix of proteins and various cells to create regenerative bandages.

A common thread among these projects is that they rely on groundbreaking technologies. However, a group of scientists from the Wound Institute of Beverly Hills is relying on a much more elemental solution to treat diabetic foot ulcers.

New Study Boosts Role of EST in Proper Wound Care

POSTED ON February 2, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound healing

A new scientific review has added further data to the effectiveness of treating wounds via electrical stimulation therapy.

A new scientific review has added further data to the effectiveness of treating wounds via electrical stimulation therapy.

In the wound care industry especially, ongoing research is essential to continued success for patients. As a result, there are always exciting studies being undertaken to uncover new truths about the human body or to develop new products like advanced dressings and skin repair tools.

However, for studies to make a difference in the real world, they have to be verified, and that comes during the lengthy peer-review process. By examining the results of studies multiple times, scientists can gauge just how these discoveries or devices will fair in the real world.

Most recently, one such review was published in the Journal of Chronic Wound Care Management and Research, featuring essential information about treating wounds via electrical stimulation therapy

Scientist Develop New Treatment for Diabetic Wounds

POSTED ON January 10, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

The solution involves a biomaterial that increases skin cell movement on chronic wounds like bed sores and ulcers.

The solution involves a special biomaterial that increases skin cell movement on chronic wounds.

Within the human body, there are several crucial cell types that aid in the wound healing process. In recent years, there have been several studies aimed at understanding a fundamental aspect of these cells: how they move. With more thorough knowledge of this basic function, scientists can create more effective wound care regimens.

In spring 2015, a team from Germany found that a special protein they named Merlin aids in the migration of epithelial cells. Then, in October 2016, another research collective from Shanghai noted that receptor molecules allow the immune cells known as neutrophils to travel to wounds sites and fend off invading microorganisms.

Now, a group from the University of Toronto’s engineering department has developed an exciting new way to help skin cells move faster, and that could be a huge breakthrough for diabetics everywhere.

Study Uncovers Why Diabetics Experience Chronic Wounds

POSTED ON October 26, 2016  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

German doctors have found that sluggish insulin metabolisms may explain why diabetes is linked to chronic wounds.

New research sheds light on the complex connections between diabetes and chronic wounds.

For millions of people with diabetes worldwide, chronic wounds are a constant concern. According to WoundCareCenters.org, there are several ways diabetes affects wound healing. These include increasing a person’s risk for infection, affecting the health of blood vessels, and causing a loss of sensation that makes self-injury more likely.

One of the root causes for these issues is a diabetic person’s delayed insulin metabolism. As Diabetes U.K. explained, this impeded metabolism impacts much of the body’s wound -healing systems, affecting everything from skin cells to how blood travels. Yet despite the influence of this insulin metabolism, experts still don’t understand the system fully.  A new study is shedding light on the connection between diabetes and wound healing.

Doctors Develop New Regenerative Bandages for Diabetics

POSTED ON September 23, 2016  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

New regenerative bandages improves wound healing.

The work of Northwestern University scientists, a new bandage features a special protein that greatly improves wound healing.

Diabetic foot ulcers are not only painful, but they’re a potentially life-altering and even fatal medical condition. Of the 29.1 million Americans who live with diabetes (per figures from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention), 15 percent will eventually develop ulcers, according to a study in the journal Diabetes Care. Not only that, but as data from the American Diabetes Association revealed, 84 percent of all lower limb amputations are preceded by ulcers.

While there are already several effective wound care products available, doctors are continually exploring new ways to better combat this condition. The latest such innovation comes courtesy of a team of biomedical engineers and researchers from Northwestern University.

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