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Archive : Tag

Keeping the Intensity Low for Diabetic Wound Healing

POSTED ON January 22, 2018  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

A new study provided insight into what type of exercise is most beneficial for diabetic wound healing.

Even a mild cut in the skin of a diabetic patient can turn into a serious wound. Clinicians offer several prevention methods to stop wounds from becoming chronic, reduce pain and avoid high treatment costs, such as protective shoes, healthy diet and regular exercise. Researchers continue to study the nuances of preventative and treatment methods to develop more comprehensive, effective solutions. The results from a recent study, published in Wounds, provided insight into what type of exercise is most beneficial for wound healing in diabetic patients.

Researchers Use Skin Cells to Create New Diabetic Wound Drugs and Reduce Animal Testing

POSTED ON December 13, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Researchers are hoping to use skin cells to test new diabetes wound drugs and reduce the need for animal testing.

Researchers at Scotland’s Glasgow Caledonian University are utilizing donated skin cells to help them develop drugs that can aid in the treatment of diabetic wounds, according to the school’s website. The scientists are also hoping that their discovery makes it unnecessary to perform testing on animals.

Self-Care an Important Part of Treating Diabetic Foot Ulcers

POSTED ON November 10, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

A molecule contained in a parasitic worm could hold a solution to treating slow wound healing.

Diabetes patients should take an active role in helping to prevent foot ulcers.

As many as 3.5 million people in the U.S. have developed a diabetic foot ulcer, according to the New England Journal of Medicine’s recent study, “Diabetic Foot Ulcers and Their Recurrence.” Meanwhile, the 2011 St. George’s Vascular Institute study “Lower extremity amputations–a review of global variability in incidence” stated that between  5 percent and 24 percent of people with a history of foot ulceration will be required to undergo limb amputation within 6-18 months.

Salt Consumption Linked to Diabetes Risk

POSTED ON October 9, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

Fish skin may be newest wound care treatment option

A recent study indicates that consuming large amounts of added sodium could contribute to diabetes development.

The American Diabetes Association stated that approximately 30 million Americans are afflicted with diabetes. Of this number, 95 percent have Type 2 diabetes, where the body is not able to properly use insulin. A portion of those with this condition are able manage their blood sugar levels with diet and exercise, but some are dependent on insulin injections. Some individuals have Type 2 diabetes for life, while others develop it over time. Diet can play a huge role in its development, some clinicians believe, and a recent study indicates that in some cases, consuming large amounts of added sodium may contribute to its emergence.

Rise in Diabetes Means New Advances in Diabetic Wound Care

POSTED ON September 27, 2017  - POSTED IN diabetic wound care

diabetic wound care

A rise in diabetes has prompted an exploration of new treatment options for diabetic wounds.

The number of cases of diabetes in the U.S. is on the rise, which is also increasing the number of cases of diabetic wounds. But clinicians are meeting the challenge with new approaches to diabetic wound care.

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