Request
a smartPAC
Contact Advanced Tissue
1-877-811-6080
webinfo@advtis.com

Archive : Tag

Everything You Need In your Family’s First-Aid Kit

POSTED ON March 22, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

Every home should have a fully-stocked first aid kit on hand.

Every home should have a fully-stocked first aid kit on hand.

 

No matter how careful you might be, household accidents are sometimes unavoidable. You may cut yourself cleaning up broken glass, or strain a muscle simply putting away boxes. When these injuries do occur, it’s essential you receive proper treatment right away. Otherwise, improperly treated injuries, especially wounds, can cause a host of other health conditions down the line.

New Burn Device Continues to Prove Success in trials

POSTED ON February 21, 2017  - POSTED IN Burn wounds

The SkinGun device for treating severe burns is making headway in a number of ongoing trials.

The SkinGun device for treating severe burns is making headway in a number of ongoing trials.

Burn injuries are a real serious health issues across the U.S. In 2016 alone, there were an estimated 486,000 hospitalizations due to these injuries, according to the American Burn Association. In order to better treat these severe injuries, doctors are always looking for new treatments to help reduce the risk of infection and regrow tissue more efficiently.

One of the more recent advancements comes from a team out of Pittsburgh, which designed a special device to treat the worst burns. The so-called SkinGun works by applying stem cells to the burn, at which point the normal wound healing process is sped up. Early trials held at Pittsburgh’s UPMC Mercy Hospital Burn and Trauma Units have had some promising success, with faster healing times and less overall scar tissue.

Now, the SkinGun is making its way into other hospitals for early clinical trials.

Professor Develops New Hydrogel for Traumatic Injuries

POSTED ON February 14, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound care products

A new hydrogel has been developed that can be applied and removed in no time flat.

A new hydrogel has been developed that can be applied and removed in no time flat.

Whether on city streets or the battlefield, traumatic injuries are a massive threat to large swathes of Americans. According to some estimates from the Amputee Coalition, of the 2 million people in the U.S. who live with limb loss, 45 percent of those cases were the result of trauma, and another 185,000 amputations occur every single year.

In order to better prevent these injuries, the U.S. military and several private organizations have come up with a slew of handy wound care devices. For instance, the Food and Drug Administration had a hand in creating XSTAT 30, a revolutionary new form of wound dressing. Around the same time, the Office of Naval Research created a special wound wrap to prevent amputations.

Today, another important tool for treating these traumatic injuries is unveiled courtesy of a team from Boston University.

Literacy Impacts Wound Compliance and Healing

POSTED ON February 3, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound care products

Advanced Tissue has taken a role in addressing the impact of literacy in wound healing.

Wound care product videos are linked to each customized Smart Pac.

Although the average adult reads on a seventh-grade level, according to an article in American Family Physician the majority of health care literature is written at the 10th grade level. Individuals with inadequate health literacy are more likely to be hospitalized than patients with adequate skills.

Bamboo Used to Develop New Wound Care Dressing

POSTED ON January 6, 2017  - POSTED IN Uncategorized, Wound healing

These new bamboo dressings were found to accelerate wound healing as well as prevent issue with odors.

These new bamboo dressings were found to accelerate wound healing as well as prevent issue with odors.

Anyone who has even the faintest insight might be aware of the sheer number of unique material types used in the wound care industry.

There are the more traditional options, like collagen and hydrocolloid. While those options are relied on most often in hospital settings, researchers are continually making upgrades and improvements. Part of that expansion means new materials. For instance, fish have become a frequent source for wound dressings, as their skin contains several beneficial compounds. However, not all new dressing types are as organic; some feature computer technology to make monitoring a snap.

Now, another dressing-related breakthrough has emerged courtesy of a team of doctors from the Centre of Innovative and Applied Bioprocessing in Punjabi, India.

Back to Top