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Archive : Tag

New Wound Care Gel Enters Final Stage of Study

POSTED ON February 15, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

A new therapy called Aurix promises to improve tissue regrowth for painful ulcers.

A new therapy called Aurix promises to improve tissue regrowth for painful ulcers.

Perhaps of all the many recent advancements in the wound care industry, there is one trend that’s proved most intriguing. Over the last few years, a number of research teams have created advanced solutions for wound healing with material taken directly from the patient.

For instance, one scientist from Lehigh University is using skin cells to help create longer lasting grafts. At the same time, a team from Michigan created a special mix of polymer and stem cells to regrow bones. Doctors in China have even found stem cells in skin appendages, and that will lead to new therapies to help with chronic wounds.

Today, another important solution takes a huge step from research to approval for wide-scale use.

Professor Develops New Hydrogel for Traumatic Injuries

POSTED ON February 14, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound care products

A new hydrogel has been developed that can be applied and removed in no time flat.

A new hydrogel has been developed that can be applied and removed in no time flat.

Whether on city streets or the battlefield, traumatic injuries are a massive threat to large swathes of Americans. According to some estimates from the Amputee Coalition, of the 2 million people in the U.S. who live with limb loss, 45 percent of those cases were the result of trauma, and another 185,000 amputations occur every single year.

In order to better prevent these injuries, the U.S. military and several private organizations have come up with a slew of handy wound care devices. For instance, the Food and Drug Administration had a hand in creating XSTAT 30, a revolutionary new form of wound dressing. Around the same time, the Office of Naval Research created a special wound wrap to prevent amputations.

Today, another important tool for treating these traumatic injuries is unveiled courtesy of a team from Boston University.

Australian Doctors Developing Wound Care Database

POSTED ON February 9, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

This database could be a great way to improve the wound care outcomes for people across the world.

This database could be a great way to improve the wound care outcomes for people across the world.

There’s no denying the many technological and scientific breakthroughs that wound care specialists are using to reshape the industry. In the last few months alone, projects involving new bleeding treatments based on electrical currents and wound mats made from artificial skin have demonstrated where medicine is headed in the coming years. 

And while those efforts help inspire doctors and encourage reluctant patients, it’s not always enough to have the latest devices or techniques. As many doctors are finding, there are issues with the very basics of how proper wound care is carried out. For instance, one recent study from a group out of Miami made important inroads into how to effectively use skin grafts to treat ulcers.

Now, a team from the University of Tasmania is launching a similar study to help improve the basic confines of wound care management.

Doctors Find New Natural Way to Prevent Scars

POSTED ON February 8, 2017  - POSTED IN Wound healing

The process involves a previously unseen transformation of cells essential to the wound healing process.

The process involves a previously unseen transformation of cells essential to the wound healing process.

Scars are a particularly sore subject for most people. Not only are they aesthetically unpleasing, but some of them can prove painful. That’s why research into minimizing the appearance of scars continues to be a central priority of wound care-related research. In the last several months alone, there have been quite a few exciting such breakthroughs.

That list includes a topical film developed by a group representing the American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists, a compound that prevents scars from forming in the first place and important new insights into scar formation following traumatic injuries.

Today, a new development in scar management and reduction comes from a joint project by scientists at the University of California, Irvine and University of Pennsylvania.

Turkish Doctors Test New Approach for Measuring Wounds

POSTED ON January 25, 2017  - POSTED IN wound care

Measurement is an important step in proper wound care.

Measurement is an important step in proper wound care.

Proper wound care begins with one step in particular: measurement. This process can be somewhat complicated, as there are several different factors involved. That includes measuring both the wound bed itself as well as the nearby skin flaps for length, width and depth.

But the measurement process also involves looking at the health of actual skin; discoloration or even slough and eschar can mean an infection, and that will require extra layers of treatment. As such, because measurements can prove costly – both in terms of time as well as financial responsibility – doctors and researchers are always finding new ways to streamline the process.

Today, a team from Turkey may have just found a more efficient way of properly measuring wounds.

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