Request
a smartPAC
Contact Advanced Tissue
1-877-811-6080
webinfo@advtis.com

Understanding Debridement: An Important Part of Wound Healing

Understanding Debridement: An Important Part of Wound Healing

  by    0   7

wound debridement and wound healing

Debridement involves the removal of necrotic tissue to promote wound healing.

During wound healing, the affected area can become overrun with necrotic – or dead – tissue. This can be harmful to the body’s ability to recover and develop new skin, so debridement may be necessary to remove that dead material. In this way, debridement is essential for preparing the wound bed to promote speedy and efficient healing.

Why is debridement important?

Debridement promotes the wound healing process in a variety of ways. Not only does dead skin inhibit the development of healthy new tissue, but it makes the affected area more susceptible to infection. It can also hide the signs of infection, as dead tissue can increase odor and exudate, making it easier for bacteria and other harmful foreign invaders to spread.

How does debridement work?

Sometimes, debridement occurs naturally on its own thanks to the body’s own ability to shed off dead tissue. However, more often, it requires a medical procedure. There are two different categories of debridement: active and autolytic. Autolytic debridement involves application of hydrocolloids and hydrogels to enhance moisture in the affected area in order to degrade it so the body will naturally deslough the dead tissue. Active debridement involves the manual removal of necrotic material, and it comes in several types of procedures, such as:

  • Surgical debridement: During this operation, a clinician will completely remove the necrotic material using a scalpel and forceps, resulting in a bleeding wound bed.
  • Sharp debridement: This is similar to surgical debridement, except that it involves the use of surgical scissors.
  • Larval therapy: Maggots or their larvae are placed on the wound site and eat away at the dead skin,leaving the healthy tissue behind.

How do I know when debridement is necessary?

Not all wounds are well suited for debridement. According to Nursing Times, acute wounds generally do not require removal of dead tissue, whereas chronic wounds such as leg or pressure ulcers are more likely to need necrotic material removed manually. However, it takes a comprehensive assessment by a qualified clinician to determine if you require this procedure to facilitate wound healing. Factors such as the patient’s general health condition, size and location of the wound, possibility of wound infection and presence of exudate also come into play.

Advanced Tissue is the nation’s leader in delivering specialized wound care supplies to patients.

 

Download our FREE Wound Treatment Product Guide for more information on wound healing.

Download Now

Related Posts

Researchers Examine Link Between Wound Healing and Time of Day

link between wound healing and time of dayCan the time of day a wound occurs affect the healing process? Research suggests it might be a factor.   In addition to where a wound is located and how it developed, researchers now also believe that the time of day you get your wound may have something to do with how it heals and […]

READ MORE →

New Gel Shows Promise in Wound Treatment and Closing

New gel shows promise in wound careResearchers are developing a gel that not only closes wounds but can help heal them as well. Closing a wound with a surgical procedure is an effective method of promoting the wound healing process and the most common methods involve the use of sutures or stapling the wound shut. However, these methods may not prove to be […]

READ MORE →

Know the Colors that Indicate Wound Healing Stages

Know the colors that indicate wound healing stagesThe color of a wound can tell you a lot about the progress of treatment. Color is often used as a signal and to issue a warning: think stoplights and fire trucks. It’s an instantly recognizable way to indicate the condition of healing wounds, of which you need to be aware.

READ MORE →

Applying Immune Cells Can Speed Up Wound Healing

Applying immune cells can speed up wound healingImmune skills helped quicken healing in mice. Wound care Centers defines a chronic wound as one that does not heal in the generally-expected timeframe, which a clinician determines to be appropriate for that wound type. For some wounds this is a couple of weeks, and for others it is closer to six weeks.

READ MORE →

When Combined With the Flu, Wound Healing Requires Special Care

Wound healing requires special careContracting the flu can mean wound treatment patients need to take special precautions. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), between 9.2 million and 35.6 million people have contracted the flu in the U.S. each year since 2010, and many of those patients are also undergoing wound care.

READ MORE →

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back to Top